You’re a schmuck, Julio.

You’re … in TEXAS.  And you vandalized … the ALAMO.  You’re probably lucky an ordinary passing private citizen didn’t draw a hand cannon on you and fire.

Pee Wee Herman embarrassed himself less when he asked about the basement.

I will never understand what pathology drives people to carve their names into landmarks.  (Wasn’t it not too long ago that two people were arrested in Rome for carving their initials into the Coliseum?)

Click here for Michael Marks’ article on Friday in the San Antonio Current:

Man Arrested For Carving His Name On Interior Wall Of The Alamo

WHAT … is that horrible TASTE in my mouth?

Thomas Jefferson once wrote that “The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.” And here is the proof — enemies of basic Constitutional freedoms can arise from anywhere in the political spectrum.

This is why I get so angry when people tell me that they don’t know what the First Amendment is. It happened all the time in New York. And ignorance of our key rights leads inevitably to the disappearance of those rights. It is precisely how civil liberties are eroded.

Yes, I am aware of certain limits on speech and press, such as that which incites violence, causes a dangerous panic (“falsely yelling fire in a crowded movie theater”), constitutes slander or libel, or violates copyright or intellectual property rights.

Still, reading the words “free speech limits” makes me feel like I just swallowed a spoonful of dog shit.

Thank you, Megyn Kelly. You handled this exchange perfectly. And you wonderfully articulated your point about how the most reprehensible examples of speech paradoxically need the most protection.