Tag Archives: 1991

Throwback Thursday: the Mary Washington College Aubade (1991-1994).

This Throwback Thursday is really just for my fellow Mary Washington College grads — what you see below are issues of Aubade, the school’s annual literary magazine, for years 1991 through 1994.  (They appear chronologically.)  For some reason I thought I remembered that the magazine was published more than once a year, but apparently I was mistaken.  (College was a very long time ago.)

I submitted a poem here only once when I was an undergraduate, and it was rejected (probably with good reason).  It didn’t bother me for long.  I’d like to think that I was a don’t-sweat-the-small-stuff kind of guy even back then.

Aubade was really a terrific lit mag.  You can judge for yourself by leafing through these right here over at the Internet Archive.  The site’s layout and format makes it quick and easy — and they’ve got issues of the magazine from as early as 1971.  Wow.

 

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Longwood High School’s Mr. Anderson has left us. 

Rest easy, Charles Bassett Anderson.   Even nearly three decades later, his students in New York remember him fondly and are saddened by his loss.

Mr. Anderson passed away on January 16.  You can find his obituary at The Long Island Advance, where he was a contributor.  (He retired from Longwood High School in 1991, according to the Advance, just a year after I and my friends were fortunate to have him as a teacher. He then became a professor, first at Suffolk Community College and later at Hofstra University).

Mr. Anderson was a superlative educator, and was responsible for some of my best memories of high school.  He was a good, kind, temperate man who was easy to interact with, despite teaching a demanding course of study.  (His 1989-90 Advanced Placement English class was rigorous, and was designed to fully prepare public high school students for the far greater demands of college.)  Mr. Anderson taught me, among other things, that academia could be both challenging and (sometimes bizarrely) fun — and that we could demand a lot from ourselves and enjoy ourselves at the same time.