Tag Archives: Creature from the Black Lagoon

Getting into the spirit of things …

I just need a Halloween horror playlist, though.  I’ve already seen this year’s “Castle Rock” and (of course) the second season of “Mr. Mercedes.”

“Vampire” (1979) and “The Last Broadcast” (1998) both come highly recommended by some horror-fan friends that I truly trust.  I also believe that I have never seen any of the classic Universal Studios monster movies in their entirety.  I’ve watched bits and pieces of a couple of them on television when I was a young kid, including “Creature From the Black Lagoon” (1954) and “The Invisible Man” (1933).  When I was a tot in the very late 70’s, the studio’s Gothic monsters were still very much a part of the zeitgeist … my older brother even had the Aurora model kits.  I finally enjoyed F. W. Murnau’s “Nosferatu” for the first time a couple of years ago, but of course the 1921 German film preceded the Universal movies, which re-imagined Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” entirely in 1931.

I’ll probably start first by trying to hunt down a copy of “The Wolf Man” (1941).  That’s the one that other everyone always recommends.

 

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Throwback Thursday: 1970’s glow-in-the-dark Universal Monsters posters!!!

I refuse to do a Throwback Thursday blog post tonight about the “Back to the Future” movies.  Yes, they were fun in their time, but I doubt they merit inundating the Internet today with images of their scenes and actors.

Behold instead the 70’s-tastic glow-in-the-dark “Creature From the Black Lagoon” poster that adorned the door of the room I shared with my older brother as a very young boy.  In case you didn’t read the preceding sentence, IT GLOWED IN THE DARK.  It did so pretty brightly too.  I remember my brother quite intently and methodically waving a desk lamp in front of it and, when the lights went out, that thing just SHINED LIKE A CRAZY DIAMOND.

My brother put it up there.  I would have been in kindergarten or first grade, I think.  I was so fascinated with this poster that I just couldn’t feel scared by it — kind of like the snakes I indiscriminately snatched up in the woods at that age.  (I’m thinking maybe Darwin would have frowned on that particular boyhood avocation.)

Believe it or not, there are actually collectors out there who not only also remember this, but who have collected all four posters in the set.  (I am still amazed at how information like this can so quickly be yielded by Google.)  There is some conflicting information about the posters’ origin and their first use as promotional materials circa 1975.  At one time they were offered as prizes inside Super Sugar Crisp Cereal.  I have a feeling that’s where my brother got ours.  For the full skinny, check out this neat article over at Retroist:

http://www.retroist.com/2013/10/29/1975-wolf-man-poster-sugar-crisp-universal-monsters/

Man, when I was little, I loved all things glow-in-the-dark.  Many years later, I had a poster of an advancing black panther about to pounce on the viewer.  (I’m talking about the animal, not a member of the Black Panther Party.)  Because that’s what fascinates an 11-year-old.  That poster actually didn’t glow in the dark.  I remedied this with two small dots from my glow-stars set.  (Yeah, I had those too.)  I put one luminescent dot in each pupil, and that bastard’s eyes glowed like the Hound of the Baskervilles.  Necessity is the mother of invention, right?

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Halloween is coming!!!

The holiday arrives in a scant three weeks.  I’ll be populating the blogosphere here and there with a few monsters.  I hope you don’t mind.

From Wikimedia Commons:  [“Julie Adams, famously pursued in the 1954 horror classic, “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” portrayed an FDA chemist who helped break up a trucking industry amphetamine ring in “330 Independence S. W.,” a 1962 episode of NBC’s Dick Powell Show.”]

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Photo credit: By The U.S. Food and Drug Administration [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.