Tag Archives: poster

OMG — COOLEST BIRTHDAY CARD EVER!!!

From a dear friend and her family!!  It unfolds into a “Captain America: Civil War” poster!  (I feel certain her boys had a hand in picking this out.)

You know you’re a weird guy when the posters you love at age 44 are the same as those you would have loved at age 14.

The question the poster poses can only be purely rhetorical, BECAUSE OF COURSE I SIDE WITH CAP.

 

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Vintage “Nosferatu” posters.

Just for fun, here are a few images of period-era posters for F. W. Murnau’s “Nosferatu: eine Symphonie des Grauens” (1922).

I’d love to have one (or more!) of these professionally framed.  Anyone aspiring to be my wealthy patron, get right on that.

 

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It’s Friday the Not Quite 13th!!

I wanted to run this “Friday the 13th” image on the last Friday the 13th, which was in November.  But that was the occasion of the terror attacks in Paris, and all of our sensibilities were devoted elsewhere.

I like it because it’s a poster for the legendary 1980 movie that I hadn’t seen before.  I actually got it from the Facebook page of actress and painter Adrienne King (pictured in her role as “Alice” below).  She’s incredibly cool and sweet, and she even wished me a happy birthday a while back!  I was also surprised to find out that she’s originally from Oyster Bay, Long Island.

Anyway, if you find her Facebook page, it’s a treasure trove for horror fans.

 

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“The Wolf Man” (1941)

Here’s what looks like a publicity still for “The Wolf Man” (1941); this is part of my efforts to monster up the blogosphere a bit this Halloween.

For some reason, it seems weird to me that the classic Universal monster movies came out before America entered World War II.  They really ARE old movies.

I had a children’s book about the making of the Universal classics when I was a kid.  I remember reading how Lon Chaney, Jr.’s makeup had to be applied — each hair was apparently placed there strand by strand.  And audiences back then were quite thrilled with the result.

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