“Our dream of safety has to disappear.”

Much can be said for social savior-faire,
Bu to rejoice when no one else is there
Is even harder than it is to weep;
No one is watching, but you have to leap.

A solitude ten thousand fathoms deep
Sustains the bed on which we lie, my dear:
Although I love you, you will have to leap;
Our dream of safety has to disappear.

—  excerpt from W. H. Auden’s “Leap Before You Look”

 

AudenVanVechten1939

Throwback Thursday: “The Lone Ranger” (1949 -1957)!

No, I obviously don’t remember “The Lone Ranger” during its initial run between 1949 and 1957.  (At least I hope that’s obvious — I’m a couple of full decades younger than that.)  But I absolutely do remember this show’s reruns from when I was a baby … maybe around 1976, if I had to guess?  I would have been about four years old.   (I was five when my family moved out of that house in Queens, New York, to rural Long Island.)

I know that people who claim early childhood memories are often viewed with skepticism — I get it.  (And I think many of us are more prone to confabulation than we’d like to admit.)  But I’ve actually got a few memories from when I was a toddler — and this is one of them.

I can remember my Dad putting “The Lone Ranger” on in the tiny … den or living room or whatever, to the left of our house’s front door and hallway.  You see the part in the intro below where the horse rears up at the .31 mark — and again at the 1:53 mark?  That was a verrrrrry big deal to me as a tot.

Go ahead, tell me I’m nuts.  I can take it.  You and I live in an age in which conspiracy theories have gone completely mainstream.  If I share something online that seems implausible to others, I figure I’m in a lot of company.

Anyway, I pretty much forgot about The Lone Ranger after that.  There was a 1981 television movie, “The Legend of the Lone Ranger,” that was remarkably well done — especially for a TV movie at the time.  I remember being pretty impressed with that — its plot-driving scene where the good guys get fatally ambushed was unexpectedly dour.

But I never bothered with the infamous 2013 film.  I occasionally enjoy movies that everybody else hates — something that earns me a lot of ribbing on Facebook — so maybe I should give it a shot.  Hell, the trailer makes it look decent.  And HBO’s “Westworld” has really whetted my appetite for westerns … which is weird, because “Westworld” is decidedly NOT a western — that’s sort of the point of its central plot device.  But still.

 

“Who controls the past, controls the future …”

“Who controls the past, controls the future: who controls the present, controls the past…

“The mutability of the past is the central tenet of Ingsoc. Past events, it is argued, have no objective existence, but survive only in written records and in human memories.
The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon. And since the Party is in full control of all records and in equally full control of the minds of its members, it follows that the past is whatever the Party chooses to make it. It also follows that though the past is alterable, it never has been altered in any specific instance. For when it has
been recreated in whatever shape is needed at the moment, then this new version IS the past, and no different past can ever have existed.”

— from George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four”

 

800px-1984-orwell-en-librairies-petite

Photo credit: By Nevil Clavain – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=76575596

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Practice social distancing.

 

 

A modest proposal for my sci-fi friends …

… if Donald Trump continues using secret police to pop up and snatch people off the streets, then please join me in referring to them as “the Morlocks.”

I’m kinda surprised we missed the opportunity the first time.

 

800px-Poster_for_the_1960_film_The_Time_Machine

Photo: Poster for “The Time Machine” (1960), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Nurse Your Favorite Heresies in Whispers

%d bloggers like this: