Tag Archives: Centers for Disease Control

Reality Bites.

This is your daily reminder that the attack on America’s Capitol on January 6th, 2021 did, in fact, happen.

No, it was not perpetrated by FBI agents.

No, it was not perpetrated by Black Lives Matter.  There is an ocean of evidence contradicting those claims.

Yes, we understand that you “don’t watch the news.” No, we don’t agree that this is a shrewd and careful method of preventing yourself from being “brainwashed.”  It seems far more likely that you are protecting a cultivated worldview from information that might contradict it.  And some of us suspect that you might also be lazy.

No, we will not always personally relate to you “what happened” so that you are able to respond to our online comments.  Being your personal news provider isn’t our responsibility.  It’s weird that you think that.  If you cannot provide information to support your own position, that’s your problem.

Yes, we understand that “the media” is biased.  Virtually all news sources are biased, because they are all staffed by human beings.  Some news sources are biased toward the Left.  Some are biased toward the Right.  The challenge for us as adults is to recognize and account for that bias — and then weigh the relative merits of any individual news report accordingly.

Willfully constructing a worldview in an information vacuum is not a viable answer.  It isn’t wise or shrewd.  It’s actually a childlike way to think, because we too easily fall into the trap of telling ourselves what we want to hear.

Some of us have noticed that you indeed DO trust “the media” when a story appears that corroborates your position.  If you so wisely avoid reading information that you deem “fake,” how are you even aware of news reports that you deem “real?”  No … we do not always believe you when you say you “just found it at random.”

When you describe “the media” as being “an enemy of the American people,” there is an outside chance that you are actually talking to a member of “the media” (or maybe their friends or family).  I was a news reporter for a couple of years.  I was young.  I was too dumb, too poor, too idealistic and too disorganized to be part of a conspiracy against the American people.  You think news reporters are organizing a plot against America?  There are news reporters who are incapable of organizing a sock drawer.  I was one of them.

No, we will not always “Google it!!” to seek information supporting your position.  It is your position — you are responsible for supporting it with facts.  If you choose not to do so, some of us might reasonably point that out.

If you present an opinion without evidence, that’s … actually okay, if you simply acknowledge it when asked.  Saying, “I don’t have evidence to back this up, but this is what I think” is perfectly alright.  It is a normal part of adult discourse.

If we do “Google it!!!” and the search results only appear to debunk your claim, some of us are quite skeptical about your claim that “Google removed it” or “Google took the information down.”  We do suspect that the evidence was never there at all.

Conspiracy arguments can be a two-way street.  If you claim that my information is fabricated by a conspiracy, can I make similar assertions about your information with equal credibility?

Here’s what I mean.  If you claim that CNN is controlled by the New World Order, can I reasonably claim that your YouTube videos are fabricated by The Freemasons?  If you claim that CDC data was planted online by the Illuminati, can I claim that the website you shared was constructed by S.P.E.C.T.R.E.?  If not, why not?  Why should your conspiracy theory be deemed credible, while mine is not?

Finally, not all of us believe that avoiding information is somehow edgy or subversive, or a heroic defiance of nefarious, unseen, powerful influencers.  There is a chance that you are simply propping up and protecting a system of false beliefs — in a way that is transparent to the rest of us.



(They blinded me with science.)

Was gonna mask up for Covid-19, but Jess, the kitchen supervisor at [location withheld], reassured me that it is just another “flu.” (SARS, MERS and the common cold are ALL “flus,” as it turns out.)  Jess is an anti-masker, by the way.

You can find me tonight writing angry letters to the CDC, the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins for misinforming me for [checks watch], more than a year now.

SCIENTISTS SCARE US BECAUSE THEY HATE OUR FREEDOM. Our non-scientist, kitchen-supervising, common-sense FREEDOM.

And if you wear a mask, then the scientists really have won.




All I want for Christmas is a new Commander-in-Chief.

I know I’m addressing here what’s already appeared all over the news, but here are the seven words that the Trump administration has allegedly banned from appearing in The Center for Disease Control’s budget documents.  (In fairness to the administration, CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald tweeted Sunday to dispute those claims, which first appeared in The Washington Post.  You can read about her response here.)

 

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A short review of “The Bay” (2012)

“The Bay” (2012) deserves credit for its effort to give viewers a detailed and well developed, found-footage science fiction-horror movie.  In depicting a brutal parasitic infection eradicating a small coastal town, writers Barry Levinson and Michael Wallach appear familiar with the basics of epidemiology and public health.  And they make nice use of a time-honored sci-fi standby — pollutants causing small organisms to mutate into large ones.

Levinson and Wallach are ambitious too.  “The Bay” follows a number of intertwining narratives winding through the entire town,  making use of more than a dozen actors and innumerable extras.  Some of those actors are quite good — especially those portraying emergency professionals, like the local emergency room doctor, the staff for the Centers for Disease Control and the bureaucrat from the Department of Homeland Security.  I think a story with this scope, and with this many characters, would have made a fine ecological techno-thriller novel.  The filmmakers really do serve up a thoughtful, serious cautionary tale that is sometimes frightening.

Despite its strengths, however, “The Bay” is still encumbered by some noticeable flaws.  There’s little structure to it, the pacing feels off, and we follow so many characters that it is hard for the viewer to get to know any one of them.  There is a news reporter whose point of view serves as a framing device, but she’s performed with little energy by the main actress, and her character isn’t scripted to be terribly likable to begin with.  Parts of the film feel redundant, too.  Levinson (who is also the director here) keeps replaying footage and key dialogue, and it’s a poor choice.

All things considered, I’d rate “The Bay” a 7 out of 10.

 

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