Tag Archives: Battlestar Galactica

Throwback Thursday: January 1, 1980 magazine covers

I hope that you are all looking forward to a rockin’ New Year’s Eve.  It’s hard to believe that we are not only ringing in a new year, but also a new decade — “2020” still sounds like science fiction to me.

Where does the time go?  Somewhere irretrievable.

Anyway, here’s a couple of Pinterest finds for my fellow 1980’s nostalgia nerds.  (We’ve got a nice little subculture goin’ on Facebook.)  These are a few covers from January 1, 1980 (or in the case of the weekly TV Guide, the decade’s first full week).  Try to wrap your head around the fact that, in a few days, the decade will have begun a full forty years ago.

Oh … I couldn’t resist throwing in a couple of comic book covers dated January 1980, too.  I actually had that issue of “Battlestar Galactica.”  I still remember it sitting in a stack at the bottom of my closet, with one or two others — vastly outnumbered by “Sgt. Rock” and various “Archie” titles.

 

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Throwback Thursday: “Movie Monsters From Outer Space,” 1983

This was another book during my grade-school days that really fed my excitement about monsters — Jerry A. Young’s 1983 children’s book, “Movie Monsters From Outer Space.”  (Why does the author’s name sound so much like a pseudonym to me?)

I’m sure it’s obscure by now.  If memory serves, this was another title I ordered from those classroom bulletins put out by Scholastic Book Clubs.  (I was in the third grade, I think.)  It gave kids a brief, fun run-down of a bunch of space-based baddies — those are the Cylons from the original “Battlestar Galactica” (1978) on the cover.

It featured a bunch of older B-movies too.  I remember really wanting to see “Forbidden Planet” (1956) after seeing a picture of its monster there.

I also seem to remember reading about Ridley Scott’s original “Alien” (1979), although I suppose that I could be recalling another book.  (It would be odd if Scott’s masterpiece were described here, because it was … kinda not for kids.)

 

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Throwback Thursday: Monogram’s “Battlestar Galactica” models (1978)

These “Battlestar Galacatica” models were released by Monogram in 1978, the same year the TV show debuted.  My older brother had all four of them hanging from the ceiling of our room.  (I was a first grader in 1978, and still a few years away from model building.)

I definitely had watched the show, but I wasn’t quite as into it as the other boys in my class.  (And that’s probably ironic, considering my sheer fanaticism as an adult for Ron Moore’s remake series between 2004 and 2010.)

The other boys were constantly screaming about it.  (Maybe I was just a quiet kid — it seemed to me at the time that they were endlessly hollering about whatever it was that they liked.)  I’m not sure why I was less enthusiastic — I certainly loved my “Star Wars.”   And a year after “Battlestar Galactica” hit the small screen, my best friend Shawn and I went nuts for a show that is now remembered by few — “Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.”

 

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Throwback Thursday: “Metal Man” action figures!

The “Metal Man” action figures are a bit of a strange late-1970’s phenomenon for two reasons.

First, Zee Toys produced them with no backstory — there was never any fictional universe established by a comic book or cartoon or movie.  They just sort of appeared under my Christmas tree around 1979 with names like “Questar,” “Radon,” and the lazily repetitive “Roton.”

Second, they were actually made entirely of die-cast metal.  They were heavy, with more joints and points of articulation than “Star Wars” figures, which were simpler and more cheaply made, if far more popular among first graders like me.

Those two things gave them a lot of mystique to an imaginative little boy.  I loved them.  Sure … they were confusing.  Radon looked a bit like a Cylon from “Battlestar Galactica,” but he wasn’t one.  And how did his “Sky Sled” fly?  Upright, so that he could see where he was going?  Did he just recline on it?  For some reason I spent a lot of time thinking about that — probably when I was supposed to be doing my homework.

Seriously, these were treasures.  I still have the above three, I think.  “Corporal Chrome” looks like he would be fun to hunt down.  And “Major Mercury” deserves his own goddam album cover.

The 1970’s … weird, but fun.

Bugeyedmonster.com has a really neat rundown of the entire toy line right here (and here’s where you can get a glimpse of “Major Mercury”):

http://www.bugeyedmonster.com/toys/metalman/

 

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