A short review of Season 1 of “Black Summer” (2019)

I don’t understand how “Black Summer” can be as good as it is.  It’s produced by The Asylum, the makers of low budget, direct-to-video ripoff films like “Atlantic Rim” (2013) and “Triassic World” (2018).  It’s a prequel to the horror-comedy “Z Nation” (2014-2018) — a show that was so bad I couldn’t make it through its first episode.  Yet “Black Summer” is inexplicably a great, albeit imperfect, TV show.  I’d rate it a 9 out 10.

I might be in the minority here; a lot of people are severely panning this show online.  And I do recognize its weaknesses — there is very little detail in its plot or character development … there is often even very little dialogue at all.  And even I recognized some plot holes.  (I’m typically a little slow on the uptake where these are concerned.)

But this bare-bones zombie story still manages to screen some likable characters, and then put them through a thrilling succession of hyper-kinetic chases and melees.  I was on the edge of my seat, and I consequently didn’t miss the methodical, detailed plotting of shows like “The Walking Dead.”  The season’s finale is crowned by an extended, eye-level, real-time action set-piece that ought to be considered a classic in the  zombie-horror subgenre.  It was mind-blowing. I just can’t dislike a horror property that genuinely scared me.

I could simply be out of step with everyone else; I often have different tastes in zombie fare.  I love Zack Snyder’s 2008 remake of “Dawn of the Dead,” which this series reminds me of.  And I also love similar overseas productions like Spain’s “[REC]” films (2007 – 2014) and Britain’s “Dead Set” miniseries (2008), while those amazing entries are hardly known among my friends.  I also cannot understand why many people who love George A. Romero’s and Robert Kirkman’s productions must always compare other films and TV shows unfavorably to them.  We can love both.  Why not?

Hey, if you don’t want to make my word for it, here is what Stephen King tweeted: “No long, fraught discussions. No endless flashbacks, because there’s no back story. No grouchy teens. Dialogue is spare. Much shot with a single handheld camera, very fluid.”

I obviously recommend this.

 

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“The Walking Dead” scene I’m waiting for, but haven’t gotten yet.

  1.  Take two characters fluent in martial arts (Morgan, Michonne, Jesus, or whatever martial arts bad guys they come up with).
  2. Have them fight one-on-one with melee weapons on a hilltop (not THE Hilltop, just an open, elevated position somewhere).
  3. Have zombies advance up the hill to attack both of them from all sides, so that they not only have to fight each other, but also multiple zombies from various angles.

It shouldn’t take a screenwriting genius to realize that the fans want this, right?

Or am I the only 80’s kid who grew up loving both ninja movies and George A. Romero’s films?

Anyway … I am loathe to criticize the show these days.  It has gotten SO much better — SO much better.  Season 9 is like a different show altogether.

 

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George A. Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead” (1968)

So I raised a few eyebrows a while back when I praised the 2004 colorized version of the late George A. Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).  A couple of horror fans gave me flack for it — I hope people realize that I was talking about the last (and best) colorization, adapted by Legend Films.  (There were several prior color versions, and the 1986 attempt by Hal Roach Studios was broadly and justifiably condemned.)

I also hope that people realize that my preferred version will always be Romero’s black-and-white original.  And it just so happens that I found an unusually good copy of it online, over at the Timeless Classic Movie Youtube channel.  (There are actually some really clean copies of a few great classics there, including 1964’s “The Last Man on Earth”).

 

Last night I watched a colorized version of “Night of the Living Dead.”

There are actually several colorized versions of George A. Romero’s 1968 classic floating around out there — the one I watched was the quite decent 2004 revision by Legend Films.  (I believe it’s the truly crude 1986 Hal Roach colorized version that is so widely reviled by fans — and with good reason.  Those green-skinned zombies looked awful in that one clip I watched.)

I had a blast with the Legend Films outing.  I cheerfully recommend it.  The colorization isn’t perfect, and it’s a little strange seeing the start of the zombie apocalypse rendered in occasionally pastel hues.  But this was a fun way to revisit a beloved film I’ve seen so often before, but only in black and white.  You can also finally fully appreciate how beautiful Judith O’Dea was.  (And, in my opinion, she and Duane Jones were damned terrific in this movie.)

Check out the clip below.