Publication notice: Poetrypoeticspleasure Ezine features “The Writer”

I am honored to share here tonight that a poem of mine was published by Poetrypoeticspleasure Ezine in India.  The poem selected was “The Writer,”  and it is featured in the October 2018 Issue, which was released today.  You can find it here at this link.

Poetrypoeticspleasure Ezine publishes English-language poetry from throughout the world, and features a variety of voices and perspectives.  I am grateful to Editor Rajnish Mishra for allowing mine to be included.

“The Writer” was first featured in 2013 by Dagda Publishing in the United Kingdom, and was included that same year in its print anthology, “Threads.”

I hope you all are enjoying the start of a terrific weekend!

 

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A short review of “Miracle Mile” (1988)

“Miracle Mile” (1988) actually came highly recommended to me.  And that’s perplexing, because this is a pretty bad nuclear war thriller that I’d only grudgingly rate a 4 out of 10.

The script is terrible.  We know that from the film’s opening minutes, when it attempts to establish Anthony Edwards as a likable protagonist by showing him performing impromptu stand-up for schoolchildren on a field trip to a Los Angeles natural history museum.  (He is not a chaperone for the field trip, or connected with these schoolchildren in any way.  He apparently just hangs around alone at museums to inexplicably crack jokes for children he does not know.)

From there, we follow an abortive, cloddishly written romance between two mostly unappealing characters.  (Mare Winningham is the other half of the romance doomed by the impending apocalypse.)  I won’t bore you with the details about the ensuing end-of-the-world thriller, except that an implausible plot device gives the nascent couple and a handful of secondary characters advance knowledge of the nuclear missiles that will hit Los Angles in just more than an hour.

Even the acting was mostly poor.  Surprisingly, this includes the performance by Edwards himself, who has shown nothing but talent in every other role in which I’ve seen him.

The movie comes close to redeeming itself near the end.  Its obligatory chaos-in-the-streets set-piece is surprisingly well done for an otherwise mediocre film, and there are a few good lines when the couple reunites at the movie’s finale.  I suppose you can also have a lot of fun spotting a bevy of other character-actors from the 80’s and 90’s.

I … can’t actually recommend this, though.  I can’t remember the last time I was this disappointed by a film that my friends insisted was great.  Check out 1983’s “Special Bulletin,” instead.  Or, better yet, hunt down Britain’s superb nuclear war mini-series, “Threads” (1984).

 

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Jenny Santellano will read one of my poems!

Hey, gang — I received some nice news today.  Poet Jenny Santellano has kindly agreed to feature a poem of mine in her ongoing video series.

Jenny is a particularly gracious creative person who allows other poets to benefit from her voice; she reads selected poems at her Youtube channel, which you can find right here.  (Seriously, guys, she has a beautiful voice.)

The poem selected is “The Writer.” It was part of a trilogy of poems entitled “Three Dreamers,” which was first published in 2013 by Dagda Publishing in its online format, and then in its print anthology, “Threads.”  (“Three Dreamers” was also subsequently published by Illumen Magazine, Dead Snakes and UFO Gigolo.)

I’ll be sure to post a link when the video appears.

Thanks Jenny!

 

 

 

Publication notice: Dead Snakes features “Three Dreamers”

I’m honored to share here that Dead Snakes published “Three Dreamers” today.  This is a set of three related poems that was first featured by Dagda Publishing, in the United Kingdom, in January 2013 — the poems’ individual titles are “The Writer,” “The Secretary,” and “The Bureaucrat.”  Dagda subsequently featured these poems in print format in its 2013 poetry anthology, “Threads.”  Finally, these poems were published in 2014 by Illumen, a quarterly print-only poetry journal here in the United States.

Editor Stephen Jarrell Williams also kindly informed me the he would feature the poems on another site for which he serves as editor — UFO Gigolo.  This online publication focuses on poetry in the genres of fantasy, horror, and science fiction.  I’m new to the site, but it looks like great fun, perhaps especially for the sci-fi and horror fans with whom I’ve become acquainted here at my blog.

You can find “Three Dreamers” at Dead Snakes right here:

“Three Dreamers,” by Eric Robert Nolan

 

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Photo credit: By IDS.photos from Tiverton, UK (Dark corridor Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

Zombies, time travel, small towns and scary sewers — check in with me at The WIP Blog Tour!

Hello, all!

I’m honored to be able to report tonight that I’ve been accorded a rather nice honor by my fellow novelist and poet, A.K. Hinchey – nomination for The WIP (Work In Progress) Blog Tour. Ms. Hinchey is a lovely voice and a friend from across the pond, hailing from Lancaster, Britain, where she is a prolific young writer and also the busy mother of a new baby girl. Her publications include short fiction in Dagda Publishing’s “All Hail The New Flesh,” as well as Dagda’s 2013 poetry collection, “Threads.” She has completed her first novel, “Incarnate,” and is hard at work on its sequel, “Bound.” She is also a terrific supporter of the independent publishing community, with in-depth reviews that introduce readers to new voices. To get a little better acquainted, check out Ms. Hinchey’s writing blog, “The Torn Page,” right here:

https://akhinchey.wordpress.com/

The WIP Blog Tour lets readers and writers catch up with one another. When nominated, indie authors can update the community about what they are working on, and share excerpts to whet their appetites. Authors are then asked to nominate a few of their peers. Read about it here:

https://akhinchey.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/wip-blog-tour-bound-incarnate-teasers-and-more/

I’m happy to say that I am still hard at work on my prose. While Dagda Publishing and Dead Snakes have been kind enough to share more of my poetry, my major works in progress include two books. The first, of course, is the sequel to my post-apocalyptic science fiction novel, “The Dogs Don’t Bark In Brooklyn Any More,” published by Dagda. While “Dogs” was primarily a character study of Rebecca O’Conner and her role in the global war between humanity and super-intelligent wolves, I hope that this new book will change the series’ pace and tone, with more action and horror to turn this into a frightening war epic.

Another project that I am quite excited about is a collection of short fiction. I began this project after being encouraged by colleagues in the community, and let me tell you, it’s great fun. “Dogs” and its sequel gave me an opportunity to take a single fictional universe and explore it in depth. But working on short stories gives me plenty of new sandboxes in which to play.

What’s ahead? Well, some of the stories will be traditional horror tales, while others will be darker mainstream fiction. We’ll take a look at what happens when time travel goes disastrously wrong, and consigns one woman to a truly unique hell. We’ll join a pedophile and child pornographer on his thirsty hunt through New York’s Penn Station – then watch as his plans go delightfully, horribly awry. We’ll tremble alongside two members of the New York City Department of Pest Management, as they discover unexpected threats in the labyrinthine subways. We’ll visit an ostensibly idyllic Virginia town, where a supernatural danger segues sadly into a horror that is all too common in the real world. And, for good, old-fashioned, gorehound fun, we’ll take a detailed, blow-by-blow look at what happens when spirited average Joes defend a supermarket full of customers from a ravenous zombie swarm.

And more. If you’ve enjoyed my writing before or want to take your first journey with me, rest assured, I do hope to please you.

Well, The WIP Blog Tour invites participants to share three lines of their work in progress. I thought I’d share the first three lines from the above-mentioned time travel story. Its title is “Today, Tomorrow, the Next Day and Forever” (c) 2015 Eric Robert Nolan.

(And, what the heck, I’ll make it four lines.)

I am going insane. I have watched my husband burn to death at least 500 times.

It always begins the same. It begins with beauty.

(c)  2015 Eric Robert Nolan

I’d like to thank AK Hinchey for nominating me for The WIP Blog Tour! I’m always grateful for her attention, and this was a lot of fun! In the meantime, be sure to check in here for my own nominations for the tour. 🙂

My review of “The Divide,” (2012)

I was surprised indeed by “The Divide” (2012) – a flawed post-apocalyptic  horror film that nevertheless has a hell of a lot going for it.  It’s a horrifying, brutal look at seven apartment building residents who survive a nuclear holocaust by sheltering together in the building’s basement.

Does that sound dark?  Because it’s a hell of a lot darker than you think it is.  This film is brutal and disturbing – even by the standards of the survival-horror sub-genre.

The script is flawed, but this movie still surprised me and held me in suspense.   You know it’s a worthwhile movie if you can’t stop watching it, even if the screenwriting isn’t perfect.  That’s partly due to a great cast – with terrific performances by Michael Biehn, Courtney Vance, Lauren German, Milo Ventimiglia,  Ashton Holmes, Rosanna Arquette and Ivan Gonzalez.

Despite the good acting all around, the runaway performance was Michael Eklund as Bobby.  This guy is an incredibly talented actor.  He nailed the role of a survivor who descends quickly into madness and depravity, and was probably the best thing about this movie.  His performance actually reminded me a hell of a lot of Buffalo Bill in “Silence of the Lambs.”  That kid was amazing and terrifying.  (I don’t think what I’m writing here is a spoiler; everyone knows the premise of the movie, and Bobby is recognized almost immediately as an erratic personality.)

This movie reminded me just a little of the superb BBC docudrama, “Threads” (1984), which was an equally brutal look at the aftermath of a nuclear war – far more so than the inferior American “The Day After,” which made headlines a year earlier.  (And doesn’t everyone in my age bracket remember that?)

The special effects budget is limited.  But the final shot of the movie is fantastic.

Again … this is not a feel-good film, even when compared with other movies like this.  This movie was written by people who have absolutely no faith in human nature.  The final choice by one character is pretty sad evidence of that.  What the character does seems inexplicable at first, but then makes perfect sense when you think about it.  And it’s pretty depressing.

I’d give this movie an 8 out of 10.

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Dagda Publishing’s Newest Poetry Anthology, “Threads,” Is Now Available!

Dagda Publishing’s newest poetry anthology, “Threads,” is now available, via Amazon.com, the Kindle Store, and the Createspace store.

I am especially excited about this release because it marks the first time any of my poetry has been included in an anthology. As I have noted here before, my set of poems, entitled “Three Dreamers,” will appear alongside the work of Dagda’s talented other contributors.

From Dagda Publishing: [Good morning folks. Here is the cover for Threads, which will be released tomorrow on Amazon. For all sales of this anthology, we shall be donating 50% of the proceeds to Shelter (Reg Charity No. 263710), and the cost of this collection of 42 poems will be £4.99 for the paperback and £1.99 for the ebook on Kindle. ]

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